Press

Recovered Coronavirus Patient Donates Blood To Help Vaccine, Treatment Research

WBZ | CBS Boston – Lara Woolfson’s COVID-19 story and her participation with Sanguine for her in-home blood sample collection. Transcript: Headline News: Live from the Channel 4 Studios in Boston, this is WBZ news at 5:30. Liam Martin: Well for a photographer from Boston who has already recovered from the coronavirus is hoping that her fight with it will help others recover as well.

San Francisco Chronicle

Antibodies in recovered victums’ blood may hold key to COVID-19 cure In the race to develop treatments for the coronavirus, two California biotech companies are teaming up to collect blood samples from people who have recovered from COVID-19 — with the hope that antibodies produced by their immune system after being infected can provide the key to developing a drug or vaccine.

Fox News Coverage on the Coronavirus Pandemic

Phlebotomist Teams Assisting Researchers in Select Cities Transcript: Trace Gallagher: Well, phlebotomists just may be the unsung heroes in the fight against COVID-19. Teams of licensed phlebotomists in select cities are suiting up in protective gear and masks and heading into homes of former coronavirus patients.

StartUp Health 2020

Transcript: Logan Plaster: Founder and CEO of Sanguine Biosciences. Brian, why don’t you to come on in? Great to see you. Brian Neman: Great to see you. How are you? Logan Plaster: Good, good, good. Take a seat. Grab the microphone and happy to have you joining us live in the Startup Health studio.

Have you recovered from COVID-19?

Biotech company needs your help with advance research. Vir Biotechnology is looking for patients in San Diego and Los Angeles counties who have recovered from COVID-19 to donate blood to help the company find better ways to diagnose and treat the infection.

Accessing Patients with In-Home Biospecimen Collection

With more than 40,000 ongoing global clinical trials, COVID-19 will cause immense delays with the advancement of research. For non-invasive biospecimen studies and clinical trials that require test subjects to visit hospitals or clinics for biospecimen collection, will the patients just stop showing up for collection?